Trade Adverts

Call Steve Cox on 07836 736496 or email for quote. Machinery removal and transportation service based in West Yorkshire, UK coverage. Crane can lift 1100kg at 1.2 metres and 420kg at 4.0 metres. Vehicle can carry 1100kg on 10 foot x 7 foot flatbed.
Now using flatbed Transit with rear mounted…
Read more...
...
STEAMPLATES produce high quality polished and enamelled name plates  etc. in Brass and Aluminium from 1" x 1/2" up to 96" x 48".  Reproduction steam related name and other plates can be made to FULL  SCALE.

We also make other…
Read more...
Want to put your advert on the site like this one. We get over 25,000 visitors a month to these pages and your name could be right here at the top of the listings. If you haven't got a web site that's no problem, we can just put the details…
Read more...
I offer a casting service specialising in small batches and one offs, producing good quality castings in variours alloys using the lost wax process, ideal for the model engineer and restorer. Any enquiries and more details can be found on my web site. www.abbeycasting.c......
Read more...
Home Workshop > General Area > General > Methylene chloride?

New forum, please make sure you select which category you need to post in. Any posts just dropped in the general category will be moved or deleted, depending on what mood the moderators are in.
Guests can reply to posts in the information forum, so you don't need to log in to answer someone.


Now 2 members online
and 172 guests online
Powered by JoomlaMe

Methylene chloride?

Methylene chloride?

Years ago I used to have a job reconditioning engines. We had a chemical dip tank which if you immersed a cast iron head in it for 3-4 hours would remove carbon, paint, oil, grease essentially back to bare metal. I need a chemical for removing carbon today and wonder if what I used back in the day was likely to have been Methylene Chloride? I can get hold of that no problem and if it is what I used formerly it would be perfect for use today.

Edited By: classictrial
Sep-12-17 20:41:13

useravatar
Chris Stevens
classictrial
Craftsman
ranks
Offline
161 Posts
Administrator has disabled public posting

Re: Methylene chloride?

Hello Chris
I expect that it was the old formula Nitromors paint stripper which has now been discontinued due to the EU wide ban on the domestic use of Dichloromethane products (the same thing as M.C.) as it has been responsible for a a number of deaths every year. The USA is also about to ban it also.
However that is for domestic use and there is a product called Paramose paint stripper which is available for bona fide professional use, so if you can convince them that you qualify, that might be your answer. I would certainly not use it on anything but a small item indoors as it is very volatile and will rapidly fill a shed with choking fumes so plenty of through draft with the bench down wind is sensible.
I have found that if you thoroughly baste the item and then wrap it in cling film - industrial weight if you can get it, it will seal the vapour in, so it continues to do its job without disappearing too quickly,the cling film seems unaffected by the chemical.  I would think that neat DCM would not adhere well as it is water thin. If you had asked me two years ago I could have given you a Winchester of it. I was helping with a friend's house clearance and there were all sorts of chemicals stored under the floor of the sitting room, fortunately the council collected it at no charge as it was deemed domestic!
Good luck and don't fumigate yourself.

Administrator has disabled public posting

Re: Methylene chloride?

Thanks Pete very useful info. I have some chemical already and was curious as if anyone had used it. Will be trying it outside so shouldnt be any problems with fumes.

useravatar
Chris Stevens
classictrial
Craftsman
ranks
Offline
161 Posts
Administrator has disabled public posting

Re: Methylene chloride?

Chris. I'd read the MSDS ( http://rlab.org.uk/images/e/ed/Dichloromethane.pdf) for  dichloromethane before you buy any, it's moderately nasty stuff .   The US MSDS makes it sound worse than the UK in the link. Years ago as Peter pointed oput it was in nitromors paint stripper, I didn't like using it then and it only ever did half a job. If you put it in a tank and leave your parts in it I think you would need to arrange good ventilation so outdoors is a must.  Personally I'd find a mechanical method. Engine reconditioners must have found a better way by now, there are large utrasonic cleaners too at  £500+ in big enough for cylinder heads,  then there is vapour blasting which probably needs to be done by a specialist.
Ashley

Ashley (Remap Volunteer look us up  www.remap.org.uk  The best volunteering opportunity for practical people)

useravatar
Ashley Slater
oznob
Ashley
Foreman
ranks
Offline
700 Posts
Male 
Administrator has disabled public posting

Re: Methylene chloride?

The chemical I used in the past was perfect and I think it was methylene chloride. For what I have in mind chemical stripping is the only feasible way to go. Have got hold of a FOC sample and will give it a go and see what happens.

useravatar
Chris Stevens
classictrial
Craftsman
ranks
Offline
161 Posts
Administrator has disabled public posting

Re: Methylene chloride?

I am a bit surprised you would use methylene chloride like this as it is quite volatile - so a tank full of liquid quite quickly evaporates, leaving a sludge of the loosened material. I think this was also used in 'pyrene' fire extinguishers - having once emptied one into plastic containers which dissolved during the following night leaving a very smelly garage.

If you are trying to remove carbon, one possibility is to burn it. Use an oxy acetylene torch to heat a small area of carbon to red heat and then turn off the fuel. The carbon will burn well in the pure oxygen with the possibility of continuing the burn into inaccessible areas providing the oxygen flow can be directed into these areas.

Administrator has disabled public posting

Re: Methylene chloride?

I have used the torch method and I have used chemical. Chemical works far better, but I wasnt aware you could even still get it bearing in mind the operations of the health/safety police!

useravatar
Chris Stevens
classictrial
Craftsman
ranks
Offline
161 Posts
Administrator has disabled public posting

Re: Methylene chloride?

I have used methylene chlroride for years, primarily as a paint stripper on large and small items. Before that, I used to use chlroroform which is also a good paint stripper. Methylene chhloride and chlorofom are closely related and have many of the same properties, anaesthesia being one of them, so don't go sniffing the bottle too much!! Methylene Chloride vapour is much denser than air so it will tend to sink to floor level, rather than rise upwards - but moving air will of course carry it. Best thing to do is whatever tank you are using, put a lid on it - wood, clingfilm, aluminium foil or whatever. If the thing is too big to go in a tank, I have used a cotton wool pad with some Methylene chloride poured onto it and covered with clingfilm or foil and sealed with masking tape or such. Even suspending something above the liquid will work, so a deep tank could be used which would help to keep things in check. That is what degreasing used to involve - suspending the item above the heated liquid - the cold object caused the vapour to condense on it and wash it without sitting in all the sludge. Chloroform was better because it has a higher boiling point - 61C as opposed to 40C - so didn't evaporate so quickly. Carbon Tetrachloride also works but not as well - but that is unobtainable now ,except from old fire extinguishers.

"He who knows nothing is closer to the truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods and errors"
Thomas Jefferson

useravatar
Peter Smithurst
PeterS
Craftsman
ranks
Offline
261 Posts
Male 
Administrator has disabled public posting

Re: Methylene chloride?

Thanks Pete. I want to try it inside 2T exhaust  systems and see if it will remove the carbon.

useravatar
Chris Stevens
classictrial
Craftsman
ranks
Offline
161 Posts
Administrator has disabled public posting

Re: Methylene chloride?

Used to use Carbon Tet to soften and wash carbon off top of pistons and inside cylinder head of a 4cyl Mercury outboard. Dangly hot vapour degreasing we used was Trichlorethylene. Tank had a cooling coil about 6" (152mm) inside below top.

You might not like what I say, but that doesn't mean I'm wrong.

useravatar
Ian Holdsworth
Circlip
Charge Hand
ranks
Offline
38 Posts
Administrator has disabled public posting

Re: Methylene chloride?

I think that the DCM will probably work fine for de-carbing as long as you can keep the vapor in for a while. I personally work with turret clocks and the pivot bearing bushes tend to get a real varnish like layer in them, a piece of tissue soaked in old type Nitromors (discontinued about five years ago, I bought a stock) cleans it out in a couple of minutes, without any scraping or abrasion to disturb the settled bearing surface. Obviously old carbon will take longer.
The other higher tech way is to find someone who does dry-ice blasting. This, as it sounds uses dry ice pellets, apparently the rapid change of state from solid to a gas cases micro shock waves which shatters the chilled dirt and brings it off, leaving no surface damage and of course no media residue. I first saw it referred to in an advert for refurbishing Heidelburg printing presses. They get pretty caked in old ink the less accessible places, the contrast between the dirty and clean views was impressive, the aluminum frames looked like new. 
Peter.

Administrator has disabled public posting

Re: Methylene chloride?

Thanks Peter. I am going to try if for decarbonising 2T exhaust systems so evaporation shouldnt be a problem..............

useravatar
Chris Stevens
classictrial
Craftsman
ranks
Offline
161 Posts
Administrator has disabled public posting

Re: Methylene chloride?

If you're decarbonising two stroke exhausts, then BSA used to recommend caustic soda (sodium hydroxide) - it works well, is cheap and (relatively) safe. The only problem is that it dissolves aluminium as well as carbon!

Administrator has disabled public posting

Re: Methylene chloride?

We used to use methylene chloride as the solvent to determine the bitumen content of road surfacing materials. It is unpleasant stuff, is a carcinogen and can attack the central nervous system. It is very little used for this purpose any more, having been superceded by less hazardous methods, mainly the ignition furnace. I for one, do not regret its passing, and would never consider its use in my home workshop. I am horrified that you guys do so. Please read any of the stuff readily available on line about methylene chloride, and rethink your approach. At least think very carefully about the recommended safety precautions, they are for once, serious.

Richard Wilson

useravatar
Richard Wilson
ettingtonliam
Charge Hand
ranks
Offline
28 Posts
Administrator has disabled public posting

Board Info

Board Stats:
 
Total Topics:
4348
Total Polls:
2
Total Posts:
10629
Total Posts Today:
2
User Info:
 
Total Users:
1399
Newest User:
John Bridge
Members Online:
2
Guests Online:
926


Forum Legend:

 Topic
 New
 Locked
 Sticky
 Active
 New/Active
 New/Locked
 New Sticky
 Locked/Active
 Active/Sticky
 Sticky/Locked
 Sticky/Active/Locked

Disclaimer

Any adverts on the homeworkshop.org.uk site are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of the administrators.

By using the site, individual posters agree not to post any defamatory or libellous posts and to accept full responsibility for the items they post.

We do not warrant that the servers that make this website available will be error, virus or bug free and you accept that it is your responsibility to make adequate provision for protection against such threats.

In no event will homeworkshop.org.uk be liable for any incidental, indirect, consequential or special damages of any kind, or any damages whatsoever, including, without limitation, those resulting from loss of profit, loss of contracts, goodwill, data, information, income, anticipated savings or business relationships, whether or not advised of the possibility of such damage, arising out of or in connection with the use of this website or any linked websites.

We do not sell, hire, share or give out your email address.

The software that runs this site (Joomla!) may transfer a temporary cookie so it can keep track of what it’s doing. As it’s temporary it maybe deleted when you leave here.

So that we can measure the popularity of posts, where people come from and other general statistics, we use Google Analytic’s. It may store cookies to track new  and repeat visitors. It does not have any detail on who you are.

Advertising links can use cookies to track from which site you came from. Some of those will be for affiliate links where cookies are used in tracking and payment systems.

All copyrights, trademarks and intellectual property rights remain with the owners unless owned or licensed by the homeworkshop.org.uk site.

This disclaimer notice shall be interpreted and governed by English law, and any disputes in relation to it are subject to the jurisdiction of the courts in England and Wales. 

 

Donate

Want to help us fund the site and time spent by the people behind it then use the button below.

We are not a registered charity so you can't claim it back but it helps pay for the costs of improving the features.

You can also help by looking at the advert on the side menus as we get paid for these BUT please only look at adverts you are interested in, you never know you might find something you never knew existed.